English 4 – Week of August 31, 2015

8/31 Monday – Today we will begin 50 Essays. Freewrite #1: Describe a time that you were stereotyped. In class of reading of Judith Ortiz Cofer’s The Myth of a Latin Woman (91-97). While reading we will compile a vocabulary list for later review and testing.

9/1 Tuesday – Picture Day in the Auditorium.

9/2 Wednesday – Active Reading Program begins!

9/3 Thursday – Finish The Myth of a Latin Woman (91-97), answer questions 1, 2 and 4 from 50 Essays on page 97.

9/4 Friday – In class work on vocabulary list created from this story: contortion, reserve, covet, microcosm, surveillance, vague, ornate, coalesce, prospective, perpetuate, innuendo, mores, promenade, obscenity, entail, metropolitan, colleague, spectacle, exploit, worldly, regale, proficiency, regale, proficiency, mechanism, menial, deduce, indelible, etch, psyche, retrospect, appraise, faux pas, misconception, omnipotent.

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AP 3 – Week of August 31, 2015

8/31 Monday – Finish the work that you began on Friday, answering questions on JFK’s Inaugural Address (2, 3, 4, 5, 6,8, 9, 10, 11) on pages 72, 73 of The Language of Composition. When completed, we will review and discuss your answers. If time, we will begin our unit on Education today by reading I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read by Francine Prose (176-186) in The Language of Composition.

9/1 Tuesday – All English classes are going to the auditorium for Picture Day.

HW: Be sure to bring an Independent Reading book to class tomorrow.

9/2 Wednesday (minimum day) – Independent Reading.

9/3 Thursday – We will review your responses to an analyze JFK’s Inaugural Address. After we are going to continue our unit on Education today by reading I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read by Francine Prose (176-186) in The Language of Composition. As you are reading, compile a list of 20 vocabulary words from the essay that you do not know and begin work on questions 1-10 on Rhetoric and Style (187)

HW: On Google Classroom, create a document of these 20 vocabulary words and include 1) the definition, 2) an antonym and 3) a synonym and 4) the word in a sentence. Due tomorrow.

9/4 Friday -In class reading of A Talk to Teachers (197-203) in The Language of Composition; when completed, answer questions 1-12 on page 203.

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AP 4 – Week of August 31, 2015

8/31 Monday Warm-up: Voice Lessons- Diction 1, Sonny’s Blues essays are due. Read pages 63-114 from The Bedford Introduction to Literature (from here on, this book will be referred to as Bedford)

HW:  1) SB essay due tonight before 11:59, 2) SB questions due today,  3) Answer the following questions: 1-6 (80), 1-5 (89,90), 1-9 (112) on Google Classroom. Due Wednesday. 2) Bring a stack of flash cards to class Thursday.

9/1 Tuesday – All English classes are going to the auditorium for Picture Day.

9/2 Wednesday (minimum day) – Independent Reading.

HW: None

9/3 Thursday – Warm-up: Voice Lessons – Imagery 1. Today we will read chapter 4 about Character (pages 115-134 in Bedford.) Please do the following:

HW: 1) Create flash cards for the following terms WITH EXAMPLES on 118-120: showing and telling, motivated characters, plausible characters, consistent characters, absurdist literature, antihero, dynamic character, static character, foil,  flat characters, stock characters, round characters. I will check your cards tomorrow. 2) Bring your Independent Book to class tomorrow.

9/4 Friday  – Warm-up: Voice Lessons- Syntax 1, Read chapter 5 (167-185) on Setting.

HW: Questions 1-10 (175) and 1-6 (185) for tomorrow on Google Classroom.

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English 4 – Week of August 24, 2015

8/24 Monday (minimum day) – Welcome to the 2015-16 school year! We will go over the following to set the stage for the year: course description, my blog, Google Classroom, what you will need, questions, etc.

HW: 1) Join Mr. Rapson’s class on Google Classroom. 2) Bring a dedicated AP English journal, highlighters, post-it notes and index cards to class Wednesday. 3) Contract is due Wednesday – please submit it on Google Classroom.

8/25 Tuesday – PBIS training, finish what was not completed yesterday.

HW: 1) Bring a dedicated AP English journal, highlighters, post-it notes and index cards to class Wednesday. 2) Contract is due tomorrow – please submit it on Google Classroom.

8/26 Wednesday (minimum day) – A look at Lou Gehrig’s farewell speech. In class reading and note taking of chapter one The Language of Composition, focusing on rhetoric. Terms you will need to know: context, purpose, thesis, claim, assertion, Aristotelian triangle, ethos, logos, pathos, counterargument, concede (concession), refute, connotation(s), propagandistic, polemical, satiric.

HW: On note cards, please finish terms definitions (above).

8/27 Thursday – Quiz on chapter one terms (see 8/26 Tuesday above); review and discussion.

HW: Bring in either paper shopping bags or other materials to cover books.

8/29 Friday – TBA.

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AP 3 – Week of August 24, 2015

8/24 Monday (minimum day) – Welcome to the 2015-16 school year!  We will go over the following to set the stage for the year: course description, my blog, Google Classroom, what you will need, questions, etc.

HW: 1) Join Mr. Rapson’s class on Google Classroom. 2) Bring a dedicated AP English journal, highlighters, post-it notes and index cards to class Wednesday. 3) Contract is due Wednesday – please submit it on Google Classroom.

8/25 Tuesday – PBIS training, finish what was not completed yesterday.

HW: 1) Bring a dedicated AP English journal, highlighters, post-it notes and index cards to class Wednesday. 2) Contract is due tomorrow – please submit it on Google Classroom.

8/26 Wednesday – A look at Lou Gehrig’s farewell speech. In class reading and note taking of chapter one The Language of Composition, focusing on rhetoric. Terms you will need to know: context, purpose, thesis, claim, assertion, Aristotelian triangle, ethos, logos, pathos, counterargument, concede (concession), refute, connotation(s), propagandistic, polemical, satiric.

HW: On note cards, please finish terms definitions (above).

8/27 Thursday – Quiz on chapter one terms (see 8/26 Tuesday above); review and discussion.

HW: Bring in either paper shopping bags or other materials to cover books.

8/28 Friday – TBA.

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AP 4 – Week of August 24, 2015

8/24 – Monday (minimum day) WELCOME BACK! We will review the following: course outline, my blog, Google Classroom, what you will need, etc.

HW: 1) Please bring a dedicated AP English notebook, highlighters, post-it notes and index cards to class tomorrow. 2) Contract Agreement (Assignment #1) is to be submitted on Google Classroom by Wednesday, August 26.

8/25 – Tuesday: PBIS presentation; whatever we did not cover yesterday.

8/26 Wednesday (minimum day): Contract agreements are due on Google Classroom. Begin reading Sonny’s Blues. There are hard copies in class; you will also find an electronic one on Google Classroom.

HW: TBA

8/27 Thursday – TBA

HW: Bring in either paper shopping bags or other materials to cover books.

8/28 Friday – TBA

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AP 3 – 2015 SUMMER ASSIGNMENT

If you have any questions about this assignment, please reread the directions and then contact Mr. Nichols at tyson.nichols@ousd.k12.ca.us. If you ask a question that is addressed in these directions, Mr. Nichols will not respond.

 

There are two parts to the summer assignment: SOAPSTone and Rhetorical Terms

 

  1. SOAPSTone

Using http://www.nytimes.com/ read the New York Times editorial section daily.

Using the schedule under Editorial/Opinion, identify and follow two columnists from this suggested list or any other New York Times columnists (Today’s Paper > Opinion {in the side bar} is one way to get there): SOME OF THESE COLUMNISTS ONLY APPEAR ON SPECIFIC DAYS EACH WEEK, NOT EVERY DAY.

Charles M. Blow

Each time you read an article, please complete a SOAPStone, which is an acronym for Speaker (identity of the voice within the text), Occasion (time and place), Audience (individual or group), Purpose (reason for the text), Subject (general topic, content and ideas) and tone of the writer. A SOAPStone template is on the other side of this page. All work should be written in complete sentences!!! In 10 weeks you should read at least 8 articles by each of your chosen writers, for a minimum total of 16 articles. An example of B level work is attached—use your ambition to do better than

that for an A. If you have trouble accessing the nytimes.com because it says you’ve reached your limit, try your browser in incognito or private mode.

2.  Rhetorical Terms

You must complete flashcards for all of the terms in the attached glossary. Tests on the words will begin at the start of the school year, so must have internalized their meaning and be able to use them for analysis. There will be a test near the beginning of the year.

 

ALL WORK MUST BE SUBMITTED IN CLASS ON MONDAY, August 24th.

You should set up your work like the following template:

The College Board’s SOAPSTone Reading Strategy

 

Speaker The voice that tells the story. The author and the speaker are NOT necessarily the same. An author may choose to tell the story from any number of different points of view. In non-fiction consider important facts about the speaker that will help assess his/her point of view / position.
Occasion The time and place of the piece; the context that encouraged the writing to happen. Writing does not occur in a vacuum. There is the larger occasion: an environment of ideas and emotions that swirl around a broad issue. Then there is the immediate occasion: an event or situation that catches the writer’s attention and triggers a response.

 

Audience The group of readers to whom this piece is directed. The audience may be one person, a small group, or a large group; it may be a certain person or a certain people.
Purpose The reason behind the text. Consider the purpose of the text in order to examine the argument and its logic. You should ask yourself, “What does the speaker want the audience to think or do as a result of reading this text?”

 

Subject The general topic, content, and ideas contained in the text. You should be able to state the subject in a few words or a phrase.
Tone The attitude of the author. The spoken word can convey the speaker’s attitude, and, thus, help to impart meaning, through tone of voice. With the written work, it is tone that extends meaning beyond the literal. Tone can be determined by examining the author’s diction (choice of words), syntax (sentence construction), and imagery (vivid descriptions that appeal to the senses). Tone should be described using adjectives. See the list below for examples.

A SELECTION OF TONE WORDS

Positive Tone/Attitude: lighthearted, hopeful, enthusiastic, confident, optimistic, loving, passionate, amused, elated, sentimental, sympathetic, compassionate, proud

 

Negative Tone/Attitude: angry, disgusted, outraged, accusing, inflammatory, irritated, indignant, threatening

 

Ironic/Sarcastic Tone/Attitude: sarcastic, cynical, critical, facetious, patronizing, satiric, mock- heroic, irreverent, mock-serious, taunting, ironic, flippant,

 

Sorrowful/Fearful/Worried Tone/Attitude: somber, elegiac, gloomy, melancholic, disturbed, mournful, solemn, serious, apprehensive, concerned, hopeless, resigned

 

General/Organizational: formal, objective, nostalgic, ceremonial, candid, shocked, reminiscent, restrained, clinical, baffled, sentimental, detached,

objective, questioning, urgent, instructive, matter-of-fact, learned, factual, didactic, informative, authoritative

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